Effects of elevated temperature in grapevine. I Berry sensory traits (pages 95–106) / (Record no. 3865)

000 -LEADER
fixed length control field 02448nma a2200229 4500
008 - FIXED-LENGTH DATA ELEMENTS--GENERAL INFORMATION
fixed length control field 2013 eng
022 ## - INTERNATIONAL STANDARD SERIAL NUMBER
ISSN 1755-0238
040 ## - CATALOGING SOURCE
Transcribing agency Sonoma County Wine Library
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-- eng
100 0# - MAIN ENTRY--PERSONAL NAME
Personal name V.O. Sadras.
245 10 - TITLE STATEMENT
Title Effects of elevated temperature in grapevine. I Berry sensory traits (pages 95–106) /
Statement of responsibility, etc by V.O. Sadras; M.A. Moran and M. Bonada.
260 ## - PUBLICATION, DISTRIBUTION, ETC. (IMPRINT)
Name of publisher, distributor, etc Australian Society of Viticulture and Oenology,
Date of publication, distribution, etc 2013.
490 0# - JOURNAL TITLE
Title of the journal Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research
520 ## - ABSTRACT
Abstract Abstract Background and AimThermal decoupling results from the differential effect of temperature on the many components of biological systems from molecular to ecosystem scales. We tested the hypotheses that elevated temperature decouples berry sensory traits, and that this effect is cultivar-dependent. Methods and ResultsWe assessed 20 sensory traits in berries from a factorial field experiment combining two temperature regimes (elevated temperature and control) and four cultivars (Cabernet Franc, Chardonnay, Semillon and Shiraz) over two thermally contrasting seasons in the Barossa Valley. The thermal response had two elements: offset, which accounts for the average advancement (or delay) across traits, and decoupling, which measures the scatter in the response of the different traits. Large decoupling was generally associated with large offset (e.g. Cabernet Franc), but large decoupling was also observed with minor offset (e.g. Semillon). Two types of decoupling were identified: decoupling mostly driven by differential response between seed and other berry components, and decoupling with a dominant variation in traits within berry parts. ConclusionElevated temperature decoupled berry sensory traits, and this effect was cultivar- and season-dependent. Significance of the StudyAwareness of the magnitude and type of decoupling would likely contribute to viticultural and winemaking adaptations in warmer regimes.
700 0# - ADDED ENTRY-PERSONAL NAME
PERSONAL NAME M.A. Moran and M. Bonada.
773 0# - SOURCE JOURNAL
Journal title Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research
Related parts (Vol.) 19. (No.) issue-1. 2013.
Issue number issue-1
Volume number 19
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URI http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ajgw.12007/references
856 42 - ELECTRONIC LOCATION & ACCESS
URI http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ajgw.12007/full
856 42 - ELECTRONIC LOCATION & ACCESS
URI http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ajgw.12007/pdf
991 ## - OAI IDENTIFIER
OAI set code AJGWR
OAI set name Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research
100 0# - MAIN ENTRY--PERSONAL NAME
-- 13548
700 0# - ADDED ENTRY-PERSONAL NAME
-- 13547
856 42 - ELECTRONIC LOCATION & ACCESS
-- Link to original article.

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