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Differences in Tolerance of Broccoli and Cabbage Cultivars to Clomazone Herbicide /

by Howard F. Harrison, Jr; Mark W. Farnham; U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Research Service, 2700 Savannah Highway, Charleston, SC 29407.
Material type: materialTypeLabelComputer fileSeries: HortTechnology.Publisher: American Society for Horticultural Science, 2013Description: Journal article.ISSN: 1943-7714.Online resources: Link to original article. In: HortTechnology (Vol.) 23. (No.) 1. 2013. (Pages.) 6-11.Summary: Clomazone herbicide is registered for cabbage (Brassica oleracea Capitata group) in the United States but not for other crop groups within the species. Greenhouse and field experiments were designed to compare the tolerance of broccoli (B. oleracea Italica group) and cabbage cultivars to clomazone to assess its potential for weed management in broccoli. Four broccoli cultivars (Captain, Green Magic, Legacy, and Patron) and four cabbage cultivars (Bravo, SC 100, Stone Head, and Vantage Point) were evaluated in all experiments. In a greenhouse experiment where seedlings were transplanted into potting medium containing clomazone at 0, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 parts per million (ppm), ‘Bravo’ cabbage was most susceptible. Its injury ratings and shoot weight reduction at 1.0 ppm were similar to ratings and shoot weight reduction for the other cabbage cultivars at 4.0 ppm. Among the broccoli cultivars, Patron was highly susceptible, exhibiting injury and shoot weight reduction similar to Bravo. Green Magic was the most tolerant broccoli cultivar, and it exhibited injury and growth reduction similar to the tolerant cabbage cultivars. In a field experiment where clomazone was applied pretransplanting at 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 lb/acre, 0.25 lb/acre caused moderate chlorosis to the susceptible cultivars, Bravo and Patron. At 0.50 and 1.0 lb/acre, most cultivars exhibited chlorosis at 2 weeks after transplanting (WAT); however, tolerant cultivars recovered and injury was often not observed at 6 WAT. At 1.0 lb/acre, chlorosis persisted until maturity on ‘Bravo’ and ‘Patron’ foliage. Clomazone did not reduce mean broccoli head weight or the percentage of plants producing market-size heads. Mean cabbage head weight for ‘Bravo’ was reduced by clomazone at 1.0 lb/acre. This study indicates that the variability in clomazone tolerance among broccoli cultivars may be similar to that among cabbage cultivars and suggests that the herbicide can be used safely on tolerant broccoli cultivars at rates that are recommended for cabbage.
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Clomazone herbicide is registered for cabbage (Brassica oleracea Capitata group) in the United States but not for other crop groups within the species. Greenhouse and field experiments were designed to compare the tolerance of broccoli (B. oleracea Italica group) and cabbage cultivars to clomazone to assess its potential for weed management in broccoli. Four broccoli cultivars (Captain, Green Magic, Legacy, and Patron) and four cabbage cultivars (Bravo, SC 100, Stone Head, and Vantage Point) were evaluated in all experiments. In a greenhouse experiment where seedlings were transplanted into potting medium containing clomazone at 0, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 parts per million (ppm), ‘Bravo’ cabbage was most susceptible. Its injury ratings and shoot weight reduction at 1.0 ppm were similar to ratings and shoot weight reduction for the other cabbage cultivars at 4.0 ppm. Among the broccoli cultivars, Patron was highly susceptible, exhibiting injury and shoot weight reduction similar to Bravo. Green Magic was the most tolerant broccoli cultivar, and it exhibited injury and growth reduction similar to the tolerant cabbage cultivars. In a field experiment where clomazone was applied pretransplanting at 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 lb/acre, 0.25 lb/acre caused moderate chlorosis to the susceptible cultivars, Bravo and Patron. At 0.50 and 1.0 lb/acre, most cultivars exhibited chlorosis at 2 weeks after transplanting (WAT); however, tolerant cultivars recovered and injury was often not observed at 6 WAT. At 1.0 lb/acre, chlorosis persisted until maturity on ‘Bravo’ and ‘Patron’ foliage. Clomazone did not reduce mean broccoli head weight or the percentage of plants producing market-size heads. Mean cabbage head weight for ‘Bravo’ was reduced by clomazone at 1.0 lb/acre. This study indicates that the variability in clomazone tolerance among broccoli cultivars may be similar to that among cabbage cultivars and suggests that the herbicide can be used safely on tolerant broccoli cultivars at rates that are recommended for cabbage.

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